The Checkylist of Albion: Part 5

This section details crime & punishment, and just crime & punishment, because I found the second episode of season 4 of The Tudors online tonight and … yeah. Took up just a chunk of my free time. 😉

1)      Crime & Punishment:

a)      How does this society police itself?
Albion has a designated cadre of local guards and constables who keep the peace. They answer to the Chief Magistrate, who ultimately answers to the King.

i)        If this body separate from the military?
Yes, technically. However, if there was ever something really big that went down, the military would probably be called in to assist. Also, if Albion was attacked, town guards would probably be instrumental in the defense of their localities.

ii)      If so:

(1)   How are the members of the police force educated?
They receive the same education as other citizens of Albion, with on-the-job training in combat and investigative techniques. Those who wish to be judges or lawyers also generally have university-level education.

(2)   What are they paid?
Honestly, if the tables from Snooty Sims are correct regarding Sim pay, not all that well – at least at the top level. (I refuse to do the comparative math for all ten levels!) The Law Career doesn’t pay all that well either. I will say, though, that members of the town guards do make enough to support their families in a comfortable middle-class existence – not wealthy, probably not sending your kids to college on a guard’s salary, but comfortable.

(3)   What is in their purview?
Keeping the peace, generally. They also investigate crimes and arrest offenders. They don’t serve as judges themselves, even though both the enforcement officials (the guards) and the interpreters of the law (the judges) ultimately both answer to the Chief Magistrate.

(4)   How susceptible are they to corruption?
I’m going to say that they’re not very susceptible, but of course stuff happens. Guards, especially if they’re peasants, make more as guards than they would in other careers open to them (specifically, working as an employee in someone else’s shop, or on their lord’s lands). I may also make a rule that Law Enforcement is one of the few respectable careers that peasants can stay at the top of (i.e., not getting moved to work in someone’s lands as soon as they’ve topped their careers).

(5)   What is the general public’s view of them?
Under Arthur, they’re generally respected, if a little feared.

(a)    Why?
The guards can go on power trips – just like anyone else handed that kind of power. Search warrants and arrest warrants also haven’t been invented yet, so they do have the power to harass citizens if that is what they so desire. However, the judiciary is reasonably fair, so even if you get thrown in gaol for no good reason, you’ll probably make it out – eventually.

(6)   Do they answer to any group other than the government?
Not if things are working right! Though I do leave open the possibility that individual Bad Guys might corrupt individual guards.

(7)   Is their equipment provided?
Yes.

(a)    What is their equipment?
Basic medieval weaponry and armor – helmets, chain mail, a surcoat designating your status as a guard, pikes and short swords for weapons.

b)      What are the prisons like?
Lovely medieval dungeons – though I haven’t actually built one in-game yet, nor have I have been brave enough to download Inge’s Prison System, so what they’re like may be subject to change.

i)        Are they kept clean?
Not really. Because Sims can’t live otherwise, I will say that they have separate bathing and excreting facilities, but they’re not exactly going over the cells with antibacterial soap once a day. There are rats, there are bugs, and none of it is particularly pleasant.

ii)      Are they abusive?
Not by design, but abuses can and do happen.

iii)    Do they enforce by removal of limbs?
I don’t even know if the CC exists for that – so I’m going to say no.

iv)    Do they enforce by removal of life?
Yes, but under the control of the judiciary – prisons do not have the power to put prisoners to death on their own.

v)      Do they have rules against cruel and unusual punishment?
Yes.

vi)    Are these rules obeyed?
For the most part, but sometimes these rules are ignored/disobeyed.

vii)  Do the prisoners do work?
No.

c)      Is there capital punishment as handed down by the state?
Yes, for certain serious crimes (murder and treason are the big ones; also, being caught as a repeat offender can trigger the death penalty).

d)     Are there trials?
Yes.

i)        If so are they overseen by a jury of peers?
In theory, yes – though of course there’s no guarantee that the twelve bums picked out will actually be your peers.

(1)   How’s that work out for them?
Better than the alternative (complete power in the hands of the judges). This way, the accused at least stand a chance.

e)      To what extent is crime organized?
Not very. There are gangs of thieves (i.e. Simon & his buddies) but they’re mostly low-level operators. There’s certainly nothing like the Mafia or anything of that kind.
Of course, this could change (Albion being a relatively new kingdom and all), particularly if a nobleman or wealthy merchant decided he wanted to, er, supplement his income …

i)        Are there actual organizations of a criminal nature?
Not yet.

(1)   How business-like are they?
It’ll be a long, long time before criminal outfits are run at all like a business.

(2)   Are they robbing people outright?
Those thieves who work in groups, yes.

(3)   Are they using rackets to extort people?
Not yet.

ii)      Is organized crime common?
Not really. The vast majority of Albion’s criminal elements are single operators – pickpockets, housebreakers, that sort of thing. There are some gangs of highwaymen, particularly near the boarders with Reme, and of course Simon and his buddies, but they aren’t the majority.

(1)   Are people loosely affiliated or is a tight knit group?
Loosely affiliated.

(2)   Why?
Because thieves are shifty, untrustworthy people, and not too trusting either. They’re mostly willing to jump ship if they find a better one in the neighborhood. Also, Mafia-level organizations have not yet evolved.

Because this was so short, a funny pic:

“OUCH!”

What happened, Mordred?

“I was tuning the piano, like you said — and the lid fell down on my head! Multiple times!”

Oh, no!

“I know, it really hurts!”

No, not that!

“Then what?”

That I didn’t pause fast enough to get a picture of when it hit!

Happy Simming!

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One thought on “The Checkylist of Albion: Part 5

  1. Lol! I like the picture also this line: though of course there’s no guarantee that the twelve bums picked out will actually be your peers.

    It sounds good. You also might have gotten a little more done if the “social issues” section hadn’t been quite so long. 😉 I think you answered everything pretty well.

    ’twill be interesting to see what happens with some of this stuff as you go. I think you should change the not making the prisoners work. All those poor peasants have to work, why should the prisoners have off?

    Make em, I dunno, arrange flowers or something equally lame. 😉

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